Looking for the Perfect Dashboard: InfluxDB, Telegraf, and Grafana – Part XXXI (Monitoring Unifi Protect)

Greetings friends, today I bring you a new entry about Grafana and Unifi, that I am sure you will like and that I hope you will put in your collection. Yes, I know there is a version called Unifi Poller, which does more or less what I explain here, but the complexity of adding it to my already running environment, and that for now, I do not need so much has made me create this lighter version, only for Unifi Protect (remember, the theme of the cameras).Today, I am pleased to bring you a complete and finished Dashboard to monitor Unifi Protect, without limit of Cameras, Cloud Key Gen2, or UDM Pro, or NVR.

Dashboard for Unifi Protect

When we finish the post we will have something similar to that Dashboard that will allow you to view it, click on each link to see it live:

Looking for the Perfect Dashboard: InfluxDB, Telegraf, and Grafana – Part XXIX (Monitoring Pi-hole)

Greetings friends, it has been a while since I expanded the series of In Search of the Perfect Dashboard, but it has taken time to continue. Today I bring you a very interesting entry, which I really wanted to add to the series, it's about how to collect Pi-hole statistics.Once we finish all the steps, you should have a result similar to the following:As you may know, if you use Pi-hole, the default interface of the solution is given an air.

VMware: How to extract Temperature information from ESXi for ARM, send it to InfluxDB, and display it with Grafana

Greetings friends, I told you a few weeks ago what VMware had just launched, and that it was going to revolutionize the world of virtualization and make it, even more, accessible in many new use cases with the new ESXi for ARM.Well, one of the things that worried me the most, I think I mentioned it in the video, was being able to control the temperature of the Raspberry Pi with ESXi for ARM, as ESXi usually gets all this data from the IPMI, iDRAC, iLO, etc.But luckily we have a hero (Tom Hebel) who works in VMware and who has compiled a native driver to extract this information, besides being able to interact with many more things.

Diagram of how this solution works

It's fine, I think, just creating a .json that telegraf then parses and writes to InfluxDB, but if I find a better way to do it, everything will get better, here the diagram:

Looking for the Perfect Dashboard: InfluxDB, Telegraf and Grafana – Part XXVIII (Monitoring HPE StoreOnce)

Greetings friends, a new week is a week with a new dashboard, this is so, I would like to be able to offer you many more use cases, with many other technologies, but time is very limited and I only have some nights to prepare this.Today we are going to see a very interesting topic, I was talking about HPE StoreOnce in previous posts, so as you can imagine, today this Dashboard is about this technology, from which we will extract information using the RESTful API that it brings with it.Once you have finished this tutorial, you will have something similar to this, it is better to give it several days or weeks to see the full potential:In awesome light-mode:In the always Matrix-look dark-mode:

Looking for the Perfect Dashboard: InfluxDB, Telegraf and Grafana – Part XXVI (Monitoring Veeam Backup for Nutanix)

Greetings friends, since a few years ago, Veeam has native protection for workloads in Nutanix Acropolis, I told you how to deploy the Proxy and configure jobs, also the article contained the new report of Veeam ONE.But it is true that the monitoring of jobs, restore points, etc. in Veeam ONE can not include as much information as we need, so I decided to expand the possibilities with Grafana.Once you have finished this tutorial, you will have something similar to this, it's better to give it several hours or days to see the whole potential:

Looking for the Perfect Dashboard: InfluxDB, Telegraf, and Grafana – Part XXV (Monitoring Power Consumption)

Greetings friends, for some time now I have been thinking and thinking about how I could monitor all the electricity consumption in my house, I have found many different ways, and in the end, I have opted for the cheapest and simplest.Once you have finished this tutorial, you will have something similar to this, it is better to give it several days or weeks to see the full potential:

Looking for the Perfect Dashboard: InfluxDB, Telegraf, and Grafana – Part XXIII (Monitoring WordPress with Jetpack RESTful API)

Greetings friends, since 2016 I have been showing you how to get the Perfect Dashboard using Grafana, InfluxDB, and Telegraf, we have come a long way together, and we have seen how to monitor a myriad of critical components, such as SSLweb page responses, VMware vSphere, Veeam, and much more.The other day I was telling you how to extract the metrics from Cloudflare, that there we can have a professional website, blog, etc. But it is true that many times we do not have something so sophisticated, and we have a blog in Wordpress with Jetpack installed.So today, we'll see how to extract information (no limits or restrictions) from the Wordpress.com Jetpack API.Once you have finished this tutorial, you will have something similar to this, it is better to give it several days or weeks to see the full potential:

Looking for the Perfect Dashboard: InfluxDB, Telegraf, and Grafana – Part XXII (Monitoring Cloudflare, include beautiful Maps)

Greetings friends, since 2016 I have been showing you how to get the Perfect Dashboard using Grafana, InfluxDB, and Telegraf, we have come a long way together, and we have seen how to monitor a myriad of critical components, such as SSL, web page responses, VMware vSphere, Veeam, and much, much more.Today we return to the basics, exploring some of the more visually appealing plugins, and giving it a more personal touch, how it is to analyze Cloudflare's statistics where we have our blog, personal website, e-commerce, etc. cached.Note: There are some limitations with the Cloudflare RESTful API:
  • It doesn't always give us the answer with the date we indicate
  • From May it will be legacy, but for now, it serves us
  • With the Free version, we can only consult in ranges of Last 24 hours, Last Week, and Last Month
Once you have finished this tutorial, you will have something similar to this, it is better to give it several days or weeks to see the full potential:

Looking for the perfect Dashboard: InfluxDB, Telegraf, and Grafana – Part XX (Monitoring SSL Certificates x.509)

Greetings friends, during these last years we have seen how to monitor all kinds of services with Grafana, InfluxDB, and Telegraf, such as VMware vSphere, Linux, Windows, Veeam and more. Today I bring you one of these entries that are extremely useful and simple at the same time.I'm talking about how to monitor your SSL certificates, yours or any manufacturer's, URLs, etc. So that we can avoid failure like the one Microsoft had just a few days ago when an SSL certificate expired due to being a leap year.

VMware: How to achieve a perfect metric collection interval with Telegraf, InfluxDB and Grafana

Greetings friends, I have told you in the past how to monitor your VMware environment using InfluxDB, Telegraf, and Grafana, and according to Grafana's dashboard, you are using it with about 4300 people in your Datacenters. All this is great, and I thank you very much for all the support and that so many people have the solution deployed.Now, I have read for a long time that in some cases you were having incidents when monitoring the datastores in a correct way, which generated that the Dashboard will not display correctly, creating a lot of frustration, but this entry will ensure you have everything configured correctly.

vSphere vCenter - real-time metrics

VMware collects information every 20 seconds from the ESXi and stores this information in vCenter RAM. This makes it really easy and fast to access this information by telegraph or any other information collector. All this information is stored only for one hour in the vCenter, in the diagram we would be number 3, accessing directly to the Performance Manager: