Veeam: Cloud Tier/Capacity Tier in Microsoft Azure Blob – Microsoft Azure Blob Monitoring with Azure Monitor and Grafana

Greetings friends, the series on Microsoft Azure Blob comes to its last post, I hope you liked it and you find it useful when selecting an Object Storage for your Veeam Backups.We still have this last entry about Microsoft Azure Blob monitoring with Grafana. Let's go to it, after we follow all the steps we will be able to have a result like this:

Veeam: Cloud Tier/Capacity Tier in Microsoft Azure Blob – Microsoft Azure Blob Monitoring with Veeam ONE

Greetings friends, we are in the penultimate post about this great series on Veeam Cloud/Capacity Tier in Microsoft Azure Blob, and today we are going to see how we can monitor this repository in our Veeam ONE.

Capacity monitoring and Offload Tier jobs in Veeam ONE v9.5 U4 - Veeam ONE Monitor

Since the last Update 4 for Veeam ONE, we can now monitor the size, and the information we have sent to our Object Storage Repositories, for this we will go to Veeam ONE Monitor, and in the Data Protection View - Backup Repositories - your Object Storage section, we can see the following: It is a fairly complete monitoring that will help us understand the consumption of this Repository, and monitor it in case it is in the cloud and we have a certain budget.If we also want to see the growth of this repository, predictions, etc, we can go to Reports and see the following.

Veeam: Cloud Tier/Capacity Tier in Microsoft Azure Blob – Quick overview to the Capacity Tier Offload task

Greetings friends, we have already seen during this series how to configure our Capacity/Cloud tier, the configuration within Veeam, in Microsoft Azure and of course a brief introduction to why use this new technology to store our oldest backups.Today I leave you some aspects that will help you to better understand the Capacity Tier process, how to launch it manually, etc.

How often does Scale-out Backup Repository Offload run?

The Scale-out Backup Repository offload task runs automatically every four hours, once we have configured our Capacity Tier, as we saw in the previous entry.This means that once we have configured everything, after four hours we will check if any of the files comply:
  • The age selected in the Capacity Tier option
  • It's a closed chain.
  • The override option has been selected if a certain % of use is reached in the Performance Tier
This Scale-out Offload process will run indefinitely every four hours.

Veeam: Cloud Tier/Capacity Tier in Microsoft Azure Blob – How to configure a Veeam Backup & Replication Scale-Out Backup Repository

Greetings friends, now that we have seen an introduction to this great series and have created the Microsoft Azure Blob, we can go to Veeam and create everything relevant to Cloud/Capacity tier.

Scale-Out Backup Repository - Basics

Before we go any further, it is important that we understand what we intend to do. Cloud/Capacity Tier builds on Veeam's Scale-Out Backup Repository to combine Performance Tier and Capacity Tier.If we saw it in a very simple diagram, we would have the following, a combination of local extents (Backup Repositories) called Performance Tier, to which is added a Capacity Tier based on Object Storage to which are sent the copies we don't need to have in the performance tier:

Veeam: Cloud Tier/Capacity Tier in Microsoft Azure Blob – How to create a Microsoft Storage Account and Azure Blob

Greetings friends, in the previous post we could see the introduction to this great series on Microsoft Azure Blob Storage, and how to send there our backups.In today's chapter we are going to see a comfortable step by step on how to create our container of Microsoft Azure Blob, for it before we will see a bit of theory.Before moving on to the content, I would like to show you the different components that make up Microsoft Azure Blob:
  • Storage Account: It is in this component where we will have to select if we want the Storage Account to be General Purpose V1, v2 or Blob directly, as well as selecting if we want it to be Hot Tier or Cool Tier, finally in the Storage Account we can also select how we want Microsoft Azure to protect this account, with geo-distribution, or locally in the region, and so on.
  • Container: In this component, which is a logical resource within a Storage Account, you can grant them access permissions, and make them public if you want.
  • Blob: It will be the content that is inside the container, content that is specially prepared to store PB of information exposing a RESTfulAPI.
And now that we're good at the different components of Microsoft Storage Account, we're going through the steps to create everything.

Veeam: Cloud Tier/Capacity Tier in Microsoft Azure Blob – Introduction

Greetings friends, a few weeks ago we saw the new functionality included for free in the latest Veeam Availability Suite v9.5 Update 4, Cloud/Capacity Tier, which allows us to move our backups that are already in retention policy to the Cloud to save disk space.Today I bring you the beginning of a series on Microsoft Azure Blob, and how to use this Cloud platform as one of the best candidates for this cloud storage of backup files.

Diagram of how it works

I would like to show you this diagram so that we understand the Veeam workflow between our local data center and Microsoft Azure Blob:We already saw in the article about Cloud/Capacity Tier, that only backup files that no longer have dependencies are susceptible to be uploaded to the cloud, this means that there are no other files as they can be incremental, or synthetic full backups depending on them, in the cases of GFS is easier to understand, since the files are Full, so they can be uploaded directly.

Veeam: Backup and restore workloads to Microsoft Azure – Migrate workloads from Microsoft Azure to our Datacenter

Greetings friends, I continue with this very interesting series about Veeam and Microsoft Azure, we have already seen practically all the steps: from interconnecting Microsoft Azure with our Datacenter, deploying the VBR in Azure, launching the copy job jobs, and of course restoring Microsoft Azure, today I bring you how to bring those VM in Azure back to our Datacenter, as you can see in this illustration:

Veeam: Backup and restore workloads to Microsoft Azure – Configuration in our Datacenter for backup to Microsoft Azure

Greetings, I continue with the series on Veeam and Microsoft Azure, let's remember the diagram of the introduction where we presented the workflow. What I'm going to show you today, step by step, is the configuration in our Veeam Backup & Replication Server of our datacenter.

Adding the Microsoft Azure repository in our Data Center

The first step of this blog, is to add the Microsoft Azure repository, in our local datacenter, remember that we have configured a new VBR in Microsoft Azure, and that we have inter-connected our datacenter and Azure.We will go to Backup Repositories - Add Repository

Veeam: Backup and restore workloads to Microsoft Azure – Deploy Veeam Backup & Replication in Microsoft Azure

Greetings friends, I continue with the series about Veeam and Microsoft Azure, if we remember the drawing of the first entry, we will see that in Microsoft Azure we will deploy a Veeam Backup & Replication server, with the purpose of serving as a Backup Repository, and at the same time be able to operate and recover jobs directly to Azure, in case our main datacenter fails:

Deploying Veeam Backup & Replication directly from the Azure Marketplace

Veeam has been offering Veeam Backup & Replication 9.5 U3 directly from the Azure Marketplace for some time now, this is very convenient and includes:
  • A fully functional and installed Windows Server 2016.
  • An automatically pre-installed instance of Veeam Backup & Replication 9.5U3, with SQLexpress
From our Microsoft Azure console, click on Create a resource, and search for Veeam, we will see several results, in this case select Veeam Backup & Replication 9.5