Veeam: AWS workloads now protected thanks to the Veeam’s acquisition of N2W Software (N2WS)

Greetings friends, probably you have heard the news that told us how Veeam had acquired N2WS, a company that is dedicated to the protection of environments in Cloud on Amazon Web Services.

Why did Veeam acquire N2WS?

N2WS is a leader in Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) data protection, providing a native cloud backup solution specifically designed for AWS workloads, enabling organizations to back up data and applications as often as needed and recover them in seconds. As Veeam customers seek to move more workloads into the cloud, especially towards AWS, protection and availability of their data is a primary concern for Veeam. Veeam's goal is to give its customers the confidence that Veeam ensures that their information is protected no matter where it resides, and this acquisition gives us the #1 solution we need for data and application protection at AWS.

Amazon Web Services at a glance

For those of you who are not up to date on Amazon Web Services, we have several elements in the Computing and Storage part. At the moment of storage of the Instances we have:
  • Block: Storage the block provided by Amazon EBS that is persistent and Amazon EC2 Instance that is ephemeral and is destroyed when the Instance is destroyed.
  • File: Amazon offers us Amazon EFS that we can connect to our instances and launch files there.
  • Object: The already known Amazon S3 for access to non-continuously used items and Glacier for very cheap storage that we access only for archiving.

Looking for the Perfect Dashboard: InfluxDB, Telegraf and Grafana – Part VIII (Monitoring Veeam using Veeam Enterprise Manager)

Hello everyone, in February of this year I wrote a script to monitor a Veeam Environment using the VeeamPSSnapIn, you can check it out on the Github page here. This post was a tremendous success, at even I had the chance to explain a bit more to the VeeamON participants, celebrated in New Orleans. But it has a minor shortcoming, it might run very slow and use some resources if the Veeam Environment is big. This new tutorial is based on the Veeam Enterprise Manager, and more particular we will use the RESTfulAPI, so it's important for now on that you have it installed and licensed.

Response times while running the Script:  VeeamPSSnapIn vs. Veeam Enterprise Manager RESTfulAPI

I think that one of the best ways to compare head to head both Scripts is to run some tests and note the execution time, on my Homelab environment I have: One VBR, 4 Repositories, 4 Backup Jobs, here you might find an image and a detailed responses: